What did the Cherokee do in response to the Indian Removal Act?

From 1817 to 1827, the Cherokees effectively resisted ceding their full territory by creating a new form of tribal government based on the United States government. In response, the Cherokees took legal action to try to save their lands. … In their second Supreme Court case, Worcester v.

How did the Cherokee tribe deal with the order to be removed from their land?

In 1835, a few self-appointed representatives of the Cherokee nation negotiated the Treaty of New Echota, which traded all Cherokee land east of the Mississippi for $5 million, relocation assistance and compensation for lost property.

How did the natives resist the Indian Removal Act?

In a nutshell: the Choctaw were the first to sign a treaty of removal but some tribal members resisted by staying behind under treaty provisions; the Cherokee used legal means to resist removal; the Seminole who considered the treaty of removal illegitimate fought two wars of resistance; the Creek refused to leave …

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What happened to the Cherokee after their forced removal to the Indian territory?

By the end of December, the removal of some 15,000 members of the Cherokee Nation was complete. The forts and camps in Alabama were abandoned and the property was sold at public auction.

How did the Cherokee contest the forced removal from their homelands?

Negotiated in 1835 by a minority party of Cherokees, challenged by the majority of the Cherokee people and their elected government, the Treaty of New Echota was used by the United States to justify the forced removal of the Cherokees from their homelands along what became known as the Trail of Tears.

Why did the Cherokees not move?

The removal of the Cherokees was a product of the demand for arable land during the rampant growth of cotton agriculture in the Southeast, the discovery of gold on Cherokee land, and the racial prejudice that many white southerners harbored toward American Indians.

What was the main purpose of the Indian Removal Act?

The Indian Removal Act was signed into law on May 28, 1830, by United States President Andrew Jackson. The law authorized the president to negotiate with southern Native American tribes for their removal to federal territory west of the Mississippi River in exchange for white settlement of their ancestral lands.

What Indians resisted the removal act?

The Cherokee Nation, led by Principal Chief John Ross, resisted the Indian Removal Act, even in the face of assaults on its sovereign rights by the state of Georgia and violence against Cherokee people.

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Who was the most famous Cherokee Indian?

Among the most famous Cherokees in history: Sequoyah (1767–1843), leader and inventor of the Cherokee writing system that took the tribe from an illiterate group to one of the best educated peoples in the country during the early-to-mid 1800s. Will Rogers (1879–1935), famed journalist and entertainer.

What steps did the Cherokee take to avoid removal?

Cherokee attempts at resisting the removal by the United States included creating a formal Cherokee constitution, negotiating the Treat of 1819, and proceeding with legal action within the Supreme Court. These actions proved futile when Andrew Jackson was elected President and forcibly removed them for their land.

How many Cherokee died on the removal?

It is estimated that of the approximately 16,000 Cherokee who were removed between 1836 and 1839, about 4,000 perished.

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